VPN Tips

How to Get ExpressVPN for Free

Simon Migliano
Simon MiglianoUpdated

ExpressVPN is our highest-scoring VPN service: no matter what device or OS you use it on ExpressVPN is a top choice. It's not cheap, though. If that's put you off then we understand - let us show you how to use ExpressVPN for free.

ExpressVPN logo

Unless you’re planning on using it exclusively on iOS, ExpressVPN doesn’t offer any sort of traditional free trial – you can see our highest rated VPNs for free trials here.

There’s good news though.

You can still make use of the ExpressVPN for up to 30 days totally free of charge, enabling you to test out all the key features before you decide to spend a cent.

If you see anywhere offering the full ExpressVPN product for free for an unlimited amount of time then know that it’s either an illegal download or a virus – don’t download it.

Here are a few 100% legal methods to use ExpressVPN for free, starting with iOS.

How to Get ExpressVPN for Free on iOS

  1. Open the App Store, search for ExpressVPN and download the VPN app onto your device.

  2. Screenshot of ExpressVPN on the Apple Store

  3. Tap the button that says ‘Create Account’, enter your email address and create a secure password.

  4. Screenshot of the Create Account screen on ExpressVPN's iOS app

  5. Once you’ve set up your account, you need to allow ExpressVPN to add VPN configurations to your device.

  6. Screenshot of ExpressVPN's iOS app permissions

  7. You’ll then be presented with a series of app permissions – you can decide whether to say yes or no to these.

  8. Screenshot of ExpressVPN iOS app crash log statistic

  9. Once you’ve done this, you’ll be presented with the main screen of ExpressVPN’s iOS app and you’ll be able to connect as normal for seven days.

  10. Screenshot of ExpressVPN's iOS app home screen

  11. There’s a separate tab in-app that shows you how much longer you’ve got before your VPN free trial runs out, and also redirects you to the website should you wish to upgrade.

  12. Screenshot of the upgrade screen in ExpressVPN's iOS app

    The great thing about ExpressVPN’s iOS free trial is that it doesn’t require you to provide any payment details on signup.

    This means that you can’t be automatically ‘upgraded’ to one of ExpressVPN’s premium VPN plans – whether or not you spend any money is entirely up to you.

    The one downside is that it’s only available on iOS, so if you want to use ExpressVPN on any other platform, you’ll need to follow one of the methods below.

How to Get ExpressVPN for Free on Other Devices (Windows, MacOS, Android & More)

The only way to use ExpressVPN for free is to take advantage of its 30-day money-back guarantee.

This is essentially the same thing as a free trial with one key difference.

ExpressVPN will take the money from your account and then return it to you when you request a refund.

Don’t worry, though – ExpressVPN is a trustworthy, professional company, and you should have no worries at all about your money being promptly returned.

Here are the steps you need to follow.

  1. Sign up for an ExpressVPN subscription. If you’re only planning on using it for 30 days, a single month is the best (and cheapest) option.

  2. ExpressVPN's pricing plans

    In order to get the most use out of the VPN service, you need to cancel as close to the 30 day limit as possible. ExpressVPN’s support informed us that while your subscription may continue ‘for a few days’ after cancellation, most will stop working straight away.

  3. Use ExpressVPN for up to 30 days – just remember to set yourself a reminder to cancel your subscription before the refund period is up.

  4. ExpressVPN homescreen on Mac

  5. Contact the customer support team via live chat and request a cancellation.

  6. ExpressVPN live chat refund request

    The agent we spoke to did ask our reason for canceling, but we simply told them we didn’t require an account anymore.

    No more questions were asked and our request was dealt with immediately.

  7. Wait for your refund to be processed – this can take anywhere from 5-7 working days.


ExpressVPN live chat refund confirmed

Refer A Friend

You can also earn 30 days of ExpressVPN for free for each friend you refer to the service.

You’ll need an active account in order to do this, but after that there’s only one step to it.

It’s easy as inviting your friends to join ExpressVPN via email or sharing a personalized link with them.

Refer a friend page on ExpressVPN's website

There’s no limit to the number of friends you can refer, either, meaning that you can potentially get months and months’ worth of ExpressVPN for nothing at all.

Is There a Free Version of NordVPN?

NordVPN Logo

There’s some good news and some bad news.

The bad news is that there’s no free version of NordVPN.

The good news, though, is that you can still use the full version of NordVPN for free.

We’ve prepared a page just like this one to show you all the tips and tricks for using the full, premium NordVPN package without having to pay – you can find it here.

You’ve likely heard of NordVPN – it’s one of the most popular VPNs on the planet. It’s well established in the market, and even sponsors Liverpool FC.

In our NordVPN review we come to the conclusion that it isn’t quite as good as ExpressVPN – but it’s still an extremely close call.

If you’re on this page in particular then NordVPN may be especially interesting to you for one reason.

NordVPN is much cheaper than ExpressVPN.

For that reason alone we’d say you at least take a look at NordVPN before making your final buying decision.

Is ProtonVPN Free?

Yes and no.

ProtonVPN is a premium, paid-for VPN – but there is a free version of it.

In our review of the paid-for version of ProtonVPN we come to the conclusion that it’s one of the best VPNs on the market.

ProtonVPN produces consistently fast download speeds, doesn’t keep any logs, and is a reliable tool for bypassing censorship.

The free version of ProtonVPN, on the other hand, can’t quite live up to those lofty standards.

It’s important to get one thing clear: as far as free VPNs go, ProtonVPN Free is very good.

If you want a free VPN you can actually trust, you have to make concessions when it comes to features. Read our full ProtonVPN Free review to find out just what’s missing.

Which VPNs Have a Free Trial?

Illustration of a credit card with a line through it and some coins

As you’ve already seen on this page, not every VPN needs to explicitly offer a free trial in order for you to trial it for free.

We’ve put together a list of our top five free VPN trials here – it’s essential reading if you’re looking to try out a VPN before fully committing.

Number one on the list is PrivateVPN.

It’s a true free trial, with no payment details required.

We wouldn’t be recommending it if it weren’t also a great VPN too, though – our testing has shown PrivateVPN to be one of the best VPNs on the market.

PrivateVPN is fast, cheap, great for streaming (including Netflix), and can be used on up to six devices at one time.

Don’t go into it blind, though – know exactly what you’re getting yourself into with our PrivateVPN review.

What Are the Best Free VPNs?

 

They may be super popular, but the truth of the matter is that the vast majority of free VPNs can’t be trusted.

Our own investigations have found that free VPNs with millions of downloads could be selling your data to advertisers, passing your browsing habits on to foreign governments, or even just be cleverly packaged viruses.

Paying for a reputable, trustworthy VPN is more than worth the small monthly cost, but we understand that not everyone can afford one.

That’s why we’ve created a list of the five best free VPNs you can download today.

Windscribe Free is the number one choice as it offers a fantastic array of features when compared to its free rivals, plus it has a very generous monthly data cap.

About the Author


  • Simon Migliano Head of Research at Top10VPN

    Simon Migliano

    Simon leads our investigations into VPN safety and internet freedom research. His work has been featured on the BBC, CNet, Wired and The Financial Times. Read full bio